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Pallikondeswarar Temple

Significance

Significance

Speciality of this temple being that all its deities are present with their consorts. They are Lord Pallikondeswarar(Lord Shiva) consorts with Goddess Sarva Mangalambikai, Lord Valmikeswarar consorts with Goddess Maragathambigai, Lord Vinayaka along with Siddhi, Buddhi, Lord Kubera consortd with Goddess Sanganidhi and Goddess Padumanidhi. Surutappali is the only temple that Lord Dakshinamoorthy graces with his consort Tara(Hindu Astral Goddess). Lord Dakshinmoorthy is very stylish sitting posture with his left leg raised and his consort peeping through from behind. This special appearance of Lord called as 'Thambadya Dakshinamoorthy'. By performing Pujas on Jupiter transit day, devotee bestowed with marriage boons, couple reunion and bless with happy and  peaceful life.
 
Greatness of this temple
 
Lord Lingothbhavar is situated behind Lord Valmikeswarar facing west direction. LordShiva is standing inside a Lingam depicting endless column of a fire. Lord Brahma is situated on the right side of the sanctum wall. A beautifully painted Nandhi at an elevated height in the huge open space is in the front of the temple. After entering the temple through the small Rajagopuram, the shrine of Lord Valmikeswarar and Goddess Maragathambigai is on the left side and the shrine of Lord Pallikondeswarar is on the right side.
 
Festival
 
Auspicious Shivarathri in the month of Feb-March, Aipasi Annabishekam in the month October-November, and Tiruvadhirai in the month of December are the festival celebrated in this temple.

About

About

Pallikondeswarar is a Hindu temple dedicated to Lord Shiva located in Surutapalli, Andhra Pradesh, India.  The temple has a traditional South Indian style, with features a five-tier architecture, with delightful entrance called 'Rajagopuram'. This temple is also famous for Pradhosa Puja. Presiding deity is Lord Pallikondeswarar (Lord Shiva) and Goddesss Maragathambigai. The temple is unique, usually Lord Shiva is seen only in the form of a Linga, but here Lord Shiva is seen in human form and that in the recilining pose on the lap of Goddess Parvathi like Vishnu Ananthaasana. The name surutapalli comes from the auspicious event where Lord Shiva took at the lap of when he was feeling and healthy and consuming the poison during the churning of ocean milk. Surutta means a little dizzy, Palli means Resting.
 
History
 
The temple is built by Vijayanagara emperor Vidhyaranyar was in dilapidated state but now it has been renovated beautifully. This temple was one of the favorite of the Paramacharya, who stayed here for sometimes days and in whose memory a dhyana Mandapam was construced in this temple.

Do & Don't

Do & Don't

Do:

  • Do pray your Ishta Devata before pilgrimage to Temple.
  • Do contact Temple Devasthanam information centre for enquiry, temple information and for Pooja details etc.
  • Do reserve your travel and accommodation at Temple well in advance.
  • Do bath and wear clean clothes before you enter the temple.
  • Do maintain silence and recite Om Namahsivaya or your Istamantram to yourself inside the temple.
  • Do observe ancient custom and traditions while in Temple.
  • Do respect religious sentiments at Temple.
  • Do deposit your offerings in the hundi only.

Don't s:

  • Do not come to Temple for any purpose other than worshipping of God and Goddess.
  • Do not smoke at Temple.
  • Do not consume alcoholic drinks at Temple.
  • Do not approach mediators for quick Darshanam. It may cause inconvenient to others.
  • Do not carry any weapon inside the temple.
  • Do not wear any head guards like helmets, caps, turbans and hats inside the temple premises.
  • Do not perform Sastanga Pranama inside the Sanctum Sanctorum.
  • Do not take much time while performing Sparsa Darshanam to God in Garbhagriha.
  • Do not buy spurious prasadams from street vendors.
  • Do not encourage beggars at Temple.
  • Do not spit or create nuisance in the premises of the temple.

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